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Dr. Michael Pifer on the Poetry of Kostandin Erznkats’i on September 26

The Zohrab Information Center is thrilled to announce the first lecture in the Fall 2019 Series on Monasticism: Reading an Ambiguous World: On the Poetry of Kostandin Erznkats’i, with Dr. Michael Pifer (University of Michigan). The talk will take place at the Guild Hall of the Eastern Diocese of the Armenian Church of America at 7 PM on Thursday, September 26. Dr. Pifer will inaugurate this series on the subject of Armenian monasteries, their education system, their place in Armenian learning and culture, and the broader world in which they exist. Kostandin Erznkats’i received a monastic education until he was at least fifteen years old, before he saw a vision in which he received the divine gift of poetry. The 13th century world in which he composed poetry was the same as the one that supported and nourished some of the greatest monasteries in Armenian history. His monastic education demonstrates how important the monasteries were to the broader cultural landscape of the time. Join us for the first lecture of Fall 2019! A reception will follow.

Kostandin Pifer ZIC Presentation 9.26.19.001

What can Armenian poetry reveal about the ways that Muslims and Christians navigated the diversity of medieval Anatolia?
In this talk, Dr. Michael Pifer (University of Michigan) will shed new light on Kostandin Erznkatsi’s late 13th/early 14th-century poem on the rose and the nightingale, which has become one of the best-known works of medieval Armenian literature. As Kostandin famously explained, his audience had difficulty understanding this poem, which draws heavily on the conventions of Islamicate poetry–including the term for the nightingale, bulbul, which is a loanword from Persian. Kostandin therefore composed a second poem to explain the first: the rose was a symbol for Christ, he instructed, while the nightingale represented Gabriel’s horn.
However, as this talk will show, Kostandin was hardly alone in this labor of adapting and changing the meaning of adjacent literary cultures. Muslim poets in medieval Anatolia likewise sought to teach audiences to discard outer narrative forms and seek the inner spiritual meanings within a text, including through the symbolic rose and nightingale. This talk therefore explores how both Muslim and Christian poets keenly desired to teach audiences how to decipher, and make meaning out of, culturally and religiously in-between forms of literary production.

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Dr. Michael Pifer is lecturer in Armenian Studies at the University of Michigan. His work brings to light the connective tissues that run through Armenian, Persian, and Turkish literary cultures, particularly in medieval Anatolia, but also beyond. Most recently. Dr. Pifer is the co-editor of An Armenian Mediterranean: Words and Worlds in Motion (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018), with Kathryn Babayan. His research has also been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities and a Manoogian Simone Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Michigan.
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July 11: An Evening of Art and Fellowship

Join the Zohrab Information Center and St. Vartan Cathedral on Thursday, July 11 for a full and exciting summer evening of art and fellowship:

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The evening will begin at 6 PM in the Guild Hall, with a presentation by photographer Hrair Hawk Khatcherian on The Fortresses of Cilicia, his new project documenting the remnants of the political life of the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia that flourished from 1080-1375. The work, including many beautiful photographs to be shown at the presentation, will be published as a book later this year. In addition to his new project, Hawk will discuss his most recent publication, Armenia: Heaven on Earth, aerial photographs of Armenia and Artsakh he has taken between 1995-2012, and his work in Armenian Cilicia since 1997.hawk in Cilicia LILK3556

Hrair Hawk Khatcherian is a prolific photographer and author of 15 books, with the forthcoming book on The Fortresses of Cilicia making 16 publications! Publications include Armenia: Heaven on Earth and Khatchkar, a stunning collection of photographs of the unique Armenian artistic expression of stone-cut crosses. His work was also used for the recent Armenia! exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the resulting catalog. Don’t miss the opportunity to hear about and see his newest work!

After the talk by Hrair Hawk Khatcherian, in lieu of our usual reception, the Zohrab Information Center invites you to join the St. Vartan Armenian Cathedral Mixer on the Plaza. The $10 admission includes wine and delicious mezze. Meet and greet with members of the Armenian community and young professionals in New York City. You’ll also have the chance to meet and speak with the newly-elevated Bishop Daniel Findikyan.

During the Mixer, there will be several pieces of art on display, for sale by silent auction. These includes paintings and work by Armenian artists in the New York area. There will also be photographic prints for auction by dynamic young Armenian photographers such as Diana Markosian. Proceeds will benefit the Zohrab Information Center. If you are unable to attend but interested in supporting the work of the Center by bidding on a piece of artwork, please contact zohrabcenter@armeniandiocese.org to learn about the artwork that will be up for auction.

The entire evening will surely be one you don’t want to miss! Join the Zohrab Information Center and the St. Vartan Cathedral for our only summer event!

Dzovinar Derderian Discusses Van Pandukhts on May 22 at 7 PM

On Wednesday, May 22 at 7 PM in the Guild Hall, Dzovinar Derderian, from the Department of Middle East Studies at the University of Michigan, will present the final lecture in the Spring 2019 Series on Migration. Her talk, Voices of Vanetsi Pandukhts (travelers and migrants) in Constantinople, 1850s-1870s, explores migration within the Ottoman Empire in the nineteenth century. Please note that this is a different date than the one appearing on the original Spring 2019 Schedule. While our series on migration has addressed the migration of Armenians from the Ottoman Empire and Turkey, especially as a result of the Armenian Genocide, as well as movement of artifacts and manuscripts, Derderian’s talk offers a perspective on the consequential migration of Armenians within the Ottoman Empire, mostly from the Eastern provinces from Istanbul. The material from this Enrichment Evening draws on Derderian’s deep expertise as a historian of the Van region and the development of ideas about the Armenian nation. As always, a reception will follow. All are invited!

This talk will focus on pandukhts from Van in Constantinople. The word “pandukht” referred to people who were away from their patria. Pandukhts from Van in Constantinople included merchants, clergymen, students and most of all in the mid-nineteenth century, labor migrants. Pandukhts in the existing scholarship and popular discourse are often thought of as destitute and melancholic people. This talk will demonstrate how voices of the pandukhts became a site of power and their very physical presence in the Ottoman capital in large numbers represented a lever of negotiation. Van Armenians referred to pandukhts as representatives of their voice and mentioned the pandukhts in their petitions to put further pressure on the Constantinople Armenian Patriarchate.

Van Pandukhts Dzovinar ZIC Presentation 5.22.19.001

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Dzovinar Derderian recently received her PhD Candidate from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor in the Department of Middle East Studies. Her dissertation is entitled “Nation-Making and the Language of Colonialism: Voices from Ottoman Van in Armenian Print Media and Handwritten Petitions (1820s to 1870s).” She has co-edited a volume entitled The Ottoman East in the Nineteenth Century: Societies, Identities and Politics (I.B. Tauris, 2016). She currently serves on the editorial board of Études arméniennes contemporaines and serves in the Executive Council of the Society of Armenian Studies.

April 24th at the Zohrab Center: Screening of “They Shall Not Perish” and Roundtable Discussion with Dr. Keith David Watenpaugh

The Zohrab Information Center invites you to an important and exciting event this April 24th. Dr. Keith David Watenpaugh, Professor and Director of Human Rights Studies at the University of California, Davis will briefly present his research on humanitarianism as it relates to the Armenian Genocide. He will then introduce the filmThey Shall Not Perish: The Story of Near East Relief. After the film screening, Dr. Watenpaugh will be joined by the executive producer of the film, Shant Mardirossian, for a roundtable discussion of the film. Together, the film screening and discussion with Dr. Watenpaugh give us the opportunity to remember the tireless efforts by aid workers during the Armenian Genocide on April 24th, the day of commemoration of the Genocide.

We will begin the introduction at 6:30 in the Guild Hall of the Armenian Diocese at 630 Second Ave., with the film screening beginning around 6:45.

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This event is co-sponsored by the Hagop Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies at New York University. In addition to this event on Wednesday, April 24th, Dr. Watenpaugh will present a lecture at the Kevorkian Center on Tuesday, April 23rd at 6 PM.

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Dr. Keith David Watenpaugh is Professor and Director of Human Rights Studies at the Watenpaugh PictureUniversity of California, Davis. He is a leading historian of human rights and humanitarianism, whose numerous publications include the book Being Modern in the Middle East: Revolution, Nationalism, Colonialism, and the Arab Middle Class (2006) and Bread from Stones: The Middle East and the Making of Modern Humanitarianism (2015). He has been a leader of international efforts to address the needs of displaced and refugee university students and professionals, primarily those affected by the wars and civil conflicts in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon and Turkey. Since 2013, Watenpaugh has directed an international multi-disciplinary research project to assist refugee university students and scholars fleeing the war in Syria. This project has garnered support from the Carnegie Corp. of New York, the Open Society Foundations and the Ford Foundation. He recently won the IIE Centennial Medal for his efforts.

Upcoming Enrichment Evenings at the Zohrab Center: 3/22, 4/4, and 4/9

The Zohrab Information Center’s Spring Series on Migration continues in March and April with three exciting book talks. Each relates to our developing theme of migration. In addition to the event with Dr. Siobhan Nash-Marshall and her book The Sins of the Fathers on this Friday, March 22 at 7 PM in the VARTAN Hall (note change in usual room location) announced previously, the Zohrab Information Center is pleased to invite you to two additional book presentations that are in addition to those advertised on the Winter/Spring Schedule.

First, on Thursday, April 4th at 7 PM in the Guild Hall, Raffi Bedrosyan will introduce his exciting new book, drawn on years of experience and reporting in Turkey, Trauma and Resilience: Armenians in Turkey- hidden, not hidden and hidden no longer.

Then, co-sponsored with the Armenian General Benevolent Union (AGBU), the Zohrab Information Center invites you to join us on Tuesday, April 9th at 7 PM in the Guild Hall for Jonathon Conlin‘s presentation of his book about the global figure of Calouste Gulbenkian, Mr. Five Percent: The Many Lives of Calouste Gulbenkian, The World’s Richest Man.

We hope to see you at all three of these exciting events. Details on the first event appear in the previous post, and the full details of the early April events are to be found below:

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Trauma and Resilience: Armenians in Turkey- hidden, not hidden, hidden no longer is a collection of articles about events in Turkey which have profoundly affected the lives of Armenians, hidden Armenians and no longer hidden Armenians who have recently returned to their roots. The genocide in 1915 not only caused the disappearance of 1.5 million Armenians from their historic homeland, but also resulted in the assimilation and Islamization of thousands of Armenian orphans, creating the ‘hidden Armenians’, the living victims of the genocide. Almost one hundred years later, certain events encouraged the grandchildren of the hidden Armenians to re-awaken and return to their Armenian roots, language and culture. Some of the articles explain these events and the author’s role in them. Some other articles reveal little known historic facts about Armenians and hidden Armenians, their contribution to culture and architecture in Turkey, still denied by the state or unknown by the peoples of Turkey. In all the articles, there is a common theme of ‘trauma’ – a mixture of negative emotions resulting from risk to one’s own life or livelihood, fear, danger, and discrimination, combined with anger, sadness and defiance in the face of continuing denial and injustice. But there is also the other common trait of ‘resilience’, the instinctive skills of flexibility, adaptation and intelligence, resulting in survival against all odds.

Raffi Bedrosyan is a civil engineer, writer and concert pianist, living in Toronto, Canada. Rafi Bedrosyan Photo by Erhan Arık2 (11)He donated proceeds from his CDs and concerts in North America and Europe toward the construction of school, highway, and water infrastructure projects in Armenia and Karabagh, in which he also participated as civil engineer. He helped organize the reconstruction of Surp Giragos Diyarbakir/Dikranagerd Church, the first reconstruction and return of property project in Turkey. His many articles in English, Armenian and Turkish media deal with Turkish-Armenian issues, Islamized hidden Armenians and history of thousands of Armenian churches left behind in Turkey after 1915. He gave the first Armenian piano concert in the Surp Giragos Church since 1915, most recently at the 2015 Genocide Centenary Commemoration. He is the founder of Project Rebirth, which helps Islamized Armenians return to their original Armenian roots, language, and culture. He has appeared as keynote speaker in numerous international conferences related to human rights, genocide studies and Armenian issues. He is the author of the book ‘Trauma and Resilience: Armenians in Turkey – hidden, not hidden and no longer hidden’, published by Gomidas Institute, England.

 

Screen Shot 2019-03-20 at 10.35.29 AMWhen Calouste Gulbenkian died in 1955 at the age of 86, he was the richest man in the world, known as ‘Mr Five Per Cent’ for his personal share of Middle East oil. The son of a wealthy Armenian merchant in Istanbul, for half a century he brokered top-level oil deals, concealing his mysterious web of business interests and contacts within a labyrinth of Asian and European cartels, and convincing governments and oil barons alike of his impartiality as an ‘honest broker’. Today his name is known principally through the Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, to which his spectacular art collection and most of his vast wealth were bequeathed.

Gulbenkian’s private life was as labyrinthine as his business dealings. He insisted on the highest ‘moral values’, yet ruthlessly used his wife’s charm as a hostess to further his career, and demanded complete obedience from his family, whom he monitored obsessively. As a young man he lived a champagne lifestyle, escorting actresses and showgirls, and in later life – on doctor’s orders – he slept with a succession of discreetly provided young women. Meanwhile he built up a superb art collection which included Rembrandts and other treasures sold to him by Stalin from the Hermitage Museum.

Published to mark the 150th anniversary of his birth, Mr Five Per Cent reveals Gulbenkian’s complex and many-sided existence. Written with full access to the Gulbenkian Foundation’s archives, this is the fascinating story of the man who more than anyone else helped shape the modern oil industry.

Dr. Jonathon Conlin is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Southhampton. He specializes in British Cultural History from 1750 to the present, often employing a cross-conlin.jpg_SIA_JPG_fit_to_width_INLINEChannel, Anglo-French, transnational perspective such as in this project on Calouste Gulbenkian. In addition to his academic work, he writes regularly for History Today magazine and has organized a number of public screenings, concerts and study days, in collaboration with the National Gallery, Tate, British Film Institute and National Gallery of Art, Washington.

March Enrichment Evenings on Tuesday, March 5th and Friday, March 22nd

The Zohrab Information Center is pleased to announce two exciting Enrichment Evenings, both presentations of new and important books, during the month of March. These two evenings continue the Spring Season theme of migration, which the Zohrab Information Center is exploring through the lens of Armenian and Armenian Christian history. Both events look at the most disastrous and momentous occasion of migration in Armenian history, the Armenian Genocide. They do so, however, from two very different lenses: one unearths significant Genocide diaries while the other makes a philosophical argument concerning continuity of genocidal policies. Together, they present some of the newest academic work on the Armenian Genocide and the most consequential migration in Armenian history.

You can also view our full schedule through Uul

First, on Tuesday, March 5th, at 7 PM in the Guild Hall of the Armenian Diocese, Dr. Vahé Tachjian will present his new book, Daily Life in the Abyss: Genocide Diaries, 1915-1918.

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In 1915, two Armenian families (the Bogharians and the Tavukjians) were deported from Ayntab (in the Ottoman Empire), together with many other Armenian inhabitants of the town. They were forcibly resettled, first, in Hama, and then in the nearby town of Salamiyya (today in Syria). Two diaries written by members of these families have come down to us: one by Father Nerses Tavukjian, the other by Krikor Bogharian.
Setting out from these diaries, the book recreates the quotidian world of deportees, ordinary lives caught in an extraordinary historical moment.
Through analysis of diaries and other source material, the book reconstructs the rhythms of daily life within an often bleak and hostile environment, in the face of a gradually disintegrating social fabric.

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Vahé Tachjian earned his PhD in History and Civilisation at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) in Paris. He is now the chief editor of the Berlin basedHoushamadyan website. His main publications are: La France en Cilicie et en Haute-Mésopotamie, Paris, 2004; Les Arméniens, 1917-1939: La quête d’un refuge, Paris, 2007 (co-editor); Ottoman Armenians: Life, Culture, Society, Vol 1, Berlin, 2014 (editor); Daily life in the Abyss: Genocide Diaries, 1915-1918, New York/Oxford, 2017.

 

Our second even in the month of March, to take place on Friday, March 22nd, at 7 PM in Vartan Hall (note change of location), is a book presentation of The Sins of the Fathers: Turkish Denialism and the Armenian Genocide by Dr. Siobhan Nash-Marshall.

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The Sins of the Fathers  explores the philosophical roots of the Armenian Genocide and picture-88-1548172947argues for Turkish denialism as a continuation of that Genocide. The first part of a trilogy, the book explores the roots of the post-truth phenomenon through the example of the Armenian Genocide, “the most successful modern project of historical and social engineering.” Professor Siobhan Nash-Marshall holds the Mary T. Clark Chair of Christian Philosophy at Manhattanville College. She is the author of many books and articles on metaphysics and the problem of evil.

Both events will be followed by a reception. All are welcome! Please contact the Krikor and Clara Zohrab Information Center at (212)686-0710 for further information. We hope to see you there!

Schedule for Spring Enrichment Evenings: Series on Migration

The Zohrab Information Center is pleased to announce the full schedule of its Winter/Spring 2019 Enrichment Evening Series on Migration. The series explores the contemporary and highly relevant topic of migration through the lens of Armenian and Armenian Christian history and current events. By looking at this timely topic through an Armenian lens, the Zohrab Information Center invites all its participants to consider a fraught topic in all its complexity. The theme of migration encompasses and exceeds the question of the Armenian Genocide, with the Genocide the focus of several of the enrichment evenings. Relics trades, manuscript movement and digitization, migration within the Ottoman Empire, and humanitarian responses to migration crises are some of the additional ways the Zohrab Information Center will explore the topic of migration. We encourage you to join us throughout the Winter and Spring Series on Migration!

The full schedule is posted below.

Please note date changes from some of the earlier versions of the schedule. If you received a previous version of the schedule at one of our events, please note the date changes, especially the April 24th and May 8th dates. This posted schedule supersedes all previous schedules. Please plan accordingly.

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