The Young Turk Revolution of 1908: Space, Symbolism and Language. Lecture by Dr. Bedross Der Matossian. May 5

2016-4 MatossianYoungTurks.001Dr. Bedross Der Matossian, Associate Professor of Modern Middle East History at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln will present a lecture at the Zohrab Information Center entitled, The Political Culture of the Young Turk Revolution of 1908: Space Symbolism, and Language on Thursday, May 5, 2106 at 7PM in the Guild Hall of the Armenian Diocese in New York.

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The Young Turk Revolution of July 24, 1908 brought jubilation to Istanbul and other cities across the Ottoman Empire. Turks and other ethnic groups shared in the festivities that heralded the demise of the old regime and the inauguration of what was to have been a new and hopeful era. To build consensus among the various ethnic groups, the Young Turks introduced new social and political definitions, new symbols, and new rituals.

Professor Der Matossian will analyze the revolutionary rituals of these festivities from the perspective of space, symbolism and language as he explores the Young Turks’ attempts to create a new civil religion that would provide solidarity and emphasize oneness rather than distinction.

Bedross Der MatossianBorn and raised in Jerusalem, Dr. Der Matossian is a graduate of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where he began his graduate studies. He completed his PhD in Middle East History at Columbia University in 2008. His areas of interest include ethnic politics in the Middle East, inter-ethnic violence in the Ottoman Empire, Palestinian history, and the history of the Armenian Genocide.

He has taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Chicago. The recipient of numerous fellowships and awards, he is the author of dozens of published articles and digital projects. His book, Shattered Dreams of Revolution: From Liberty to Violence in the Late Ottoman Empirewas published by Stanford University Press in 2014.

The lecture is free and open to the public. A reception will follow. For further information contact the Zohrab Information Center at zohrabcenter@armeniandiocese.org or (212) 686-0710.

 

Book of the Week: The Ghosts of Anatolia

GhostsAnatoliaby CHRISTOPHER PIRIC

The Ghosts of Anatolia is a gripping and heart-wrenching adventure novel by Dr. Steven E. Wilson that chronicles the suffering and path to forgiveness of a young boy during the Armenian Genocide. The lurid yet intriguing tale begins with disgruntled and grumpy Sirak Kazerian who leaves his house in search for coffee only to find his son Keri conversing with George Liralian, the man who he blames for concealing the truth behind the death of his other son, Ara. After beating George over the head with his cane, Sirak is chided and taken home by his son. When the two engage in an intense heart-to-heart, Keri inquires about his family’s origins, which Sirak has neglected to share for many years. After Keri persistently probes, Sirak reluctantly agrees to recount his and his family’s devastating experience.

Continue reading “Book of the Week: The Ghosts of Anatolia”

Ottoman Era Photographs. A Fine Exhibit at the CUNY Graduate Center

2012-12 OttomanPhotoA small but fine exhibit of vintage photographs from Egypt, Palestine, Syria and Lebanon from the late 19th and early 20th centuries is currently on display at the City University of New York Graduate Center. The Center is located at 365 Fifth Avenue at 34th Street.

Many of the images come from the renowned studios of Armenian photographers working in Constantinople such as Pascal Sebah, J.P. Sebah, Abdullah Freres, Lekegian and Bonfils. Other photographers represented include Zangaki, Arnoux, Beator, Dumas and Lehnert and Landrock.

The exhibit comprises nearly 70 high-quality reproductions of original photographs in the private collection of Dr. Joseph E. Malikian, Ph.D., author of the recent album, The Armenians in the Ottoman Empire: An Anthology and a Photo History (Antelias, Lebanon, 2011).

Many of the photographs are exquisitely crisp and dramatic portrayals of peasants in their daily life against the backdrop of village scenes, mosques and churches in Egypt and Palestine.

The exhibit is been sponsored by, and is located in CUNY’s Middle East and Middle Eastern American Center (Room 6304.24), and will be in place through May 2013.