MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD! | ARMENIAN DIASPORA SURVEY

We are delighted to note that the Armenian Diaspora Survey (ADS), a public opinion study project, has been launched throughout the United States and in the province of Ontario, Canada.  

If you consider yourself to be a member of the Armenian Diaspora, we invite you to share your thoughts and views about identity, culture, and community and help us gain a better understanding of the Armenian diaspora.   

The survey will be available across the Unites States and Ontario, Canada until July 29, 2022. Your answers will remain anonymous and the results will be made public early next year through the ADS website.   

Your views and ideas are important. Make your voice heard by completing the questionnaire at www.armeniandiasporasurvey.com.   

We also kindly ask for your help in spreading the word by forwarding this information to your friends and family currently living in the United States and Ontario, Canada. 

The study is funded by the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation and administered by the Armenian Institute in London. For more information, please consult ADS’s Frequently Asked Questions and Privacy Policy.  

Many Thanks!  

The Armenians of Bourj Hammoud: A Book Presentation

NOTE: THIS LECTURE HAS BEEN RESCHEDULED TO TUESDAY, JUNE 6, 2015 at 7PM.

On the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, the Zohrab Information Center and the Department of Armenian Studies of the Diocese of the Armenian Church (Eastern), in collaboration with the A.G.B.U. Ararat Magazine, will present a new photographic exposé of a vibrant Armenian community that rose from the ashes of that calamity. #bourjhammoud

Ariane Ateshian Delacampagne will present her new book, Portraits of Survival: The Armenians of Bourj Hammoud. The author-photographer will speak about her work and exhibit many of her vivid photographs, as she tells poignant stories of survival and success.

The event will take place on Thursday, March 5 at 7PM in the Guild Hall of the Armenian Diocese, 630 2nd Avenue, New York.

2015-03 PortraitsBourjBourj Hammoud in northeast Beirut, Lebanon, is home to a close-knit, vibrant Armenian community of shopkeepers, craftspeople and artists, young and old, a thriving combination of modern commerce and traditional trades. In less than a century the area has transformed itself from a tent city of refugees — the Armenians who fled Turkey in 1915 and began flocking here in the 1920s — to a bustling urban economic center.

It is here that Delacampagne, a photographer of Armenian descent, chose to focus her lens. She spent years among the remarkable people working and living here: the tailors and cobblers, embroiderers and clockmakers, jewelers and gem cutters, and the families. The result is an unforgettable portrait of the spirit and courage, the enterprise and heritage, which forms the soul of Bourj Hammoud.

Ariane Ateshian Delacampagne is a noted photographer born in Beirut, Lebanon. Her latest work is a photographic exposé of the vibrant Armenian community of Bourj Hammoud, born from the ashes of the Genocide 100 years ago.
Ariane Ateshian Delacampagne is a noted photographer born in Beirut, Lebanon. Her latest work is a photographic exposé of the vibrant Armenian community of Bourj Hammoud, born from the ashes of the Genocide 100 years ago.

Ariane Ateshian Delacampagne was born in Beirut, Lebanon. She has a master’s in political science from the American University of Beirut and studied photography at the International Center of Photography in New York. She currently lives and works in New York.

The evening is free and open to the public. A reception will follow. For further information contact the Zohrab Center at zohrabcenter@armeniandiocese.org or (212) 686-0710.

2012-03 BourjHammoudCLICK HERE to download a color flyer. #bourjhammoud

Portraits d’une survie: les Arméniens de Bourj Hammoud / Portraits of Survival: the Armenians of Bourj Hammoud (Somogy éditions d’art, 2014) represents Delacampagne’s most intensive project to date.  Continue reading “The Armenians of Bourj Hammoud: A Book Presentation”

Repatriation and Deception: American-Armenian Repatriates to Soviet Armenia. Hazel Antaramian-Hofman to Speak on March 20

Departure day for three young American-Armenians setting sail on the Russian ship Rossiya from New York to Soviet Armenian in 1947. In the center is Hazel Antaramian-Hofman's father. Courtesy of the Antaramian Family, 2012.
Departure day for three young American-Armenians setting sail on the Russian ship Rossiya from New York to Soviet Armenia in 1947. In the center is Hazel Antaramian-Hofman’s father. Courtesy of the Antaramian Family, 2012.

Beginning in 1946, tens of thousands of Armenians living in the Diaspora responded to to an orchestrated appeal made by Soviet officials and Armenian organizations to “go back” home to Armenia. While most of the “repatriates” [հայրենադարձ / hayrenatarts] hailed from the Middle East and Europe, scores of American-Armenians set sail for Armenia. It would be the beginning of unimaginable cultural and economic hardships as well as a set-back to those who had longed for their ancestral homeland. Diaspora-born “repatriates” struggled to survive and fit in to post-World War II Soviet Armenia, which would never really be home for them.

Born in Soviet Armenia at the height of the Cold War, artist and writer Hazel Antaramian-Hofman is the daughter of diaspora-born repatriates. She will give a multi-media presentation entitled, Repatriation and Deception: Post World War II Repatriation to Soviet Armenia on Thursday, March 20 at the Zohrab Center in New York.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD A FLYER.

Hope-filled American-Armenians awaiting their ship to the Soviet Union destination Armenia in 1947. Courtesy of Zabel Chookaszian Melconian, 2013.
Hope-filled American-Armenians awaiting their ship to the Soviet Union—destination Armenia—in 1947. Courtesy of Zabel Chookaszian Melconian, 2013.

Using music, images and text, Repatriation and Deception includes gripping stories and telling photographs to portray what the repatriates experienced and how they were deceived. Antaramian-Hofman will review the ethnographic history and propaganda used to entice diasporan Armenians from France, Egypt, Lebanon, Iran, Iraq, Syria, Greece, Palestine and the United States to “return” to what was for most of them an unknown and unrecognizable homeland, fully Sovietized by Stalin, and economically shattered in the wake of the second World War.

She will focus on the American-Armenians, the most economically advanced of the repatriates and the least in number.

The presentation, which is free and open to the public, will begin at 7:00PM and last one hour. A question and answers session and reception will follow. For further information contact the Zohrab Center at (212) 686-0710 or zohrabcenter@armeniandiocese.org. #ZICrepatriation

In 1947 Antaramian-Hofman’s parents were in their youth when they “repatriated” with their families to an Armenia under Stalin. Her father was born in the United States and her mother, in France. Continue reading “Repatriation and Deception: American-Armenian Repatriates to Soviet Armenia. Hazel Antaramian-Hofman to Speak on March 20”